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WILDFIRES & DISASTERS
  • FIRE DANGER: TREES FOR BASTROP RECOVERY

    The lost pines ecosystem is an inclusion within the larger Post Oak Savannah ecoregion. Deep Carrizo sands provide a unique set of conditions for tree species within the Post Oak Savannah. The Lost Pines region gets its name from the drought hardy variety of loblolly pine that grows within the area. This pine is the westernmost distribution of the loblolly pine, any other variety of pine should not be planted. 

     

    The following is a short list of trees well adapted to the lost pines area.  

    Key: (MAD)

    M - Moist soil 
    A - Adaptable to site
    D - Dry sites

     

    Ash, green  M  
    Ash, white  A 
    Blackhaw, rusty  A 
    Bumelia, gum  A 
    Catalpa A 
    Cottonwood, eastern M  
    Dogwood, roughleaf MA 
    Elm, American MA 
    Elm, cedar  A 
    Elm, slippery MA 
    Elm, winged MA 
    Eve’s necklace   D
    Farkleberry  A 
    Hickory, bitternut  A 
    Hickory, black M  
    Laurel, cherry M  
    Mulberry, red MA 
    Oak, bur  A 
    Oak, Chinkapin  A 
    Oak, Coastal live  A 
    Oak, Monterey MA 
    Orange, Osage MA 
    Pecan, native MA 
    Persimmon, Texas/Mexican   D
    Pine, drought-hardy loblolly MA 
    Plum, Mexican  A 
    Possumhaw A 
    Redbud, eastern  A 
    Redcedar, eastern  A 
    Sugarberry/Hackberry MA 
    Sumac, flameleaf  A 
    Sycamore, American M  
    Soapberry, western  A 
    Willow, desert   D

     

     


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